Columbus Marathon Result

Well the marathon didn’t go as I’d hoped, thanks to some severe cramps at mile 22. Ultimately, I finished with a time 3:25:17 … still less than my my super-secret tertiary goal of 3:30.

Despite the time, I still had a great day, and enjoyed running the course. Now, I’m looking forward to a few months of low mileage and having my weekends back!

At the finish line of the 2014 Columbus Marathon.

Columbus Marathon Weekend!

A younger Michael in 2007, running in the St. Louis Half Marathon.

Since 2004, I’ve run at least one half or full marathon a year – for a total of a few dozen half marathons with a 1:27:19 PR and four full marathons (Chicago, Tallahassee, Niagara Falls International, and Columbus) with a 3:20:31 PR. Hard to believe I’ve been doing this for 10 years now.

Tomorrow, I’ll race the Columbus Full again and try to hit a new personal record of ~3:15, with a “back up” goal of hitting <3:20. Columbus puts on a great race, with a nice flat course. I think I’ve always enjoyed these long races (as well as the training) because it gives me an opportunity to explore wherever I’m living – and forces me to get out and run in places I may be visiting.

Anyhow – I’m looking forward to this trip and race (see the map below).

2014 Columbus Marathon Map

Bike Maps, TRB and Temporal Matters

A few updates:

New Cinci Bike MapThis past year, my MA student Nate W has been working on a new bicycle map for the Cincinnati metro. He’s finally received the shipment of maps, and distributed them throughout the city. For more on the map and locations where you can pick up your own free bike map, check out his page here: http://cincymap.org/blog/bike-map-locations/

Next, my PhD student Daniel S has had a great run lately, having two papers accepted for presentation at the peer-reviewed Annual Meeting of the Transportation Review Board. More can be said about this work soon, but for now – Daniel is examining how urban residents’  movements can be used to understand a city’s form and function. I’ll be excited to discuss this more when the work is officially published.

Finally, I’ve had a few papers officially come out – the one I’m most excited about is titled “When are food deserts: integrating time into research on food accessibility.” Other work that has “officially” come out include a paper on how access to supermarkets via transit in Cincinnati can be quite variable – potentially leading to uncertainty, and a paper exploring twitter’s utility as a public health surveillance tool. We got some University of Cincinnati coverage on the latter piece here: http://www.uc.edu/news/NR.aspx?id=20535.

Beyond all of these developments, I am co-organizing the upcoming 2015 AAG’s International Geospatial Health Research Symposium, and am actively involved (chairing/organizing) in sessions titled “Mobility, Health and the City”, “Spatial Epidemiology”, and “Innovative Geospatial Applications for Food and Health Research.” Shoot me an email if you’re interested in any of these!

 

Hybrid agent-based and optimization model paper published

Quick update – a new paper of mine, combining agent-based and spatial optimization methods was just officially published at the journal Transactions in GIS. You can find the early view version here:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tgis.12092/abstract

Figure from recent Transactions in GIS article.

Figure from recent Transactions in GIS article.

 

To quickly describe the methodology, we used an ABM to simulate an evacuation scenario, and regularly ran spatial optimization models to redistribute disaster relief teams / emergency supplies, which in turn affected whether an agent would choose to evacuate. This resulted in an interesting feedback dynamic, documented in depth in the pdf.

A few more papers I’ve led will be hitting the “online-first” shelves in the next month or two – I’ll update the blog with more then!

 

Getting ready for Fall 2014

The start of the fall semester is just around the corner, and I’m busy finalizing my courses (on health/medical geography), organizing a health geography speaker series, working on a few research projects, and getting in a few more “days off”.

Cincinnati Children’s

The first event in the health geography series is confirmed for September 26 at 4pm and will feature Andy Beck, MD MPH of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center. Dr. Beck will be speaking about his use of GIS and spatial thinking in his research and everyday medical practice. More on this talk and the two others will be posted as things are finalized!

I also have a few new papers coming out, as well as some other interesting research projects completed with my graduate students, that’ll be ready to share very soon. Stay tuned for more!

WSTLUR 2014 – Delft

Thanks to the University of Cincinnati’s Faculty Development Council, I’m heading to the Netherlands in about a week to attend the World Symposium on Transport and Land Use Research (WSTLUR).

Once there, I’ll have the opportunity to interact with academic leaders studying transportation’s impact on society and will support my co-author, Steve Farber, as he presents work we’ve recently completed looking at the impact of variable transit frequency on accessibility to healthy foods.

Delft – the location of WSTLUR 2014

After the conference, I’ll make my way southwest to Ghent, Belgium to discuss a few research ideas with Drs. Steve Farber and Tjis Neutens at Universiteit Ghent.

I’ll check in after the trip with an update.

Summer! Bikes, Papers, Travel, and other things

The semester concluded in late april, and I’ve been keeping busy. In May a grant proposal was submitted, a workshop was workshopped, two articles were sent out, and a load of revisions are beginning to be dealt with.

A few more papers will be submitted before the summer is over and I have one more conference (in Delft! more on that in a later post) – so productivity is the name of the game.

However, it wouldn’t be summer without some sort of break.

A little logo I drew up :D

A little logo I drew up 😀

From May 31 – June 6 I road the Ohio to Erie trail in reverse, so technically the Erie to Ohio trail. I was joined by a friend from college and friend/fellow geographer/Ohioan Harvey Miller.

We had a great time riding across the state – which is much more beautiful than I ever knew! Our route took us through Cleveland,  Akron, Massillon, Gambier, Mt. Vernon, Centerburg, Columbus, Yellow Springs, Xenia, Loveland, and finally Cincinnati. The majority of our ride was on separated bike paths – in fact the segments between Columbus and Cincinnati and Cleveland and Akron were particularly nice and reminded me of bike “expressways.” Nice not to have to worry about cars zipping past you…

Below you’ll see us dipping our rear tires in Lake Erie, followed by us dipping our front tires in the Ohio River.

Fun side note: Almost immediately after dipping my front tire and successfully navigating the entire ride from Cleveland to Cincinnati without any major issues (not even one flat between the three of us!), I wiped out on a riverfront rail road track. Oh well! Every good bike tour needs at least one fall!

Lake Erie tire dipping

Lake Erie tire dipping

Ohio River tire dipping

Ohio River tire dipping

 

Lazy Saturday Watching the Olympics

It’s a cold Saturday in Cincinnati, so I’m loafing around our apartment watching the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

Because I don’t want to feel completely unproductive as I sit here sipping coffee and developing strong opinions about international women’s hockey, speed skating, and ice dancing, I made a map. Well, two maps with the same data (the number of teams each country has sent to Sochi) – but in different projections.

First we have a loximuthal projection … chosen because it looks like a frumpy egg (click image for full resolution).

olympic MAP-luximuthal

Second we have the two point equidistant world projection. It does a good job of emphasizing the (primarily western) countries with a large number of participating teams.

olympic MAP-twopointequidistant

New research to be published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

My new paper “Patterns of Chronic Conditions in Older Adults: Exploratory Spatial Findings from the ElderSmile Program” has recently been accepted for publication in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

In the paper, we find significant clustering of diabetes cases amongst the ElderSmile population – potentially indicating a need for geographically targeted diabetes care for older adults in northern Manhattan.

I’ll post a link to the article as soon as it clears production. Thanks to my co-authors (Mary Northridge, Bibhas Chakraborty, Stephen Marshall, Ira Lamster, Susan Kum, and Sara Metcalf) for their input, feedback, and additional analysis!

 

November

Well… November certainly came a lot sooner than I thought it would!

It’s been a productive summer. Many students have been taught. Many advisees advised. Many beers brewed. Many papers were sent out for review and even a few grant proposals are under way.

If you’re considering a graduate degree in geography, please contact me or any other faculty at the University of Cincinnati’s Department of Geography. We’d be happy to tell you more about our research and advising.

A more substantive post will appear here in the near future!